Benefits of the Recovery Run

 Photo by Emma Simpson

Photo by Emma Simpson

recovery run?

Recovery and run do not sound like they belong in the same sentence there Coach! Well hear me out. There are many benefits to the “Recovery Run” and they may not be what you’re thinking. 

A lot of folks think a recovery run is a great way to flush out lactic acid and keep the legs fresh for some more hard training. It is widely believed that you recover from the hard workout the day before by increasing blood flow to the legs and speeding up your recovery time. Truth is…it may be that the “Recovery Run” has nothing to do with recovery at all. 

getting better all the time

It has to do with getting better. Becoming a better version of yourself, a better runner is what we’re all after. First off a recovery run is a run so you’re building Aerobic Capacity just by getting out the door. 

Recovery runs are also great because they force you to run in a pre-fatigued state. You did a hard workout yesterday, you’re tired so what better way to build strength than heading out for a run? These recovery runs will help you when you’re struggling late in a race. It’s not just the physical strength either, you’ll remember even after that hard workout the next day you got your butt up and ran. You are one tough cookie. 

You’ll also learn to recruit different muscle groups by running while tired and that can be a huge help late in a race. You’re going to need all those muscles firing on race day so make sure you use them in training. 

how do we do it?

Speaking of training make your recovery runs should be easy, think about time on your feet rather than pace or distance. Comfortable, conversational pace should be the goal. These runs are also a great time to focus on your form, it can be tough to think about form when your ripping quarters at race pace, but during those easy three or five mile runs chill out and focus on proper form. 

See you out on the Rhode! 

Cheers,

Coach Eric

Written with some help from Greg Strosaker’s article at Active.com

Eric LonerganComment